Tag Archives: Mance Rayder

The Lost Mission of Mance Rayder

NOTE: This will probably be incorporated into the Mannifesto at some point but for now I’m posting as a mostly self-contained piece.

This essay serves one purpose and one only:

To reveal the secret mission that was Mance Rayder’s true goal in the north during the events of A Dance with Dragons.

Explain the relevance of that mission on other aspects of the plot.

Explore significant implications of its discovery.

Let’s get straight to business then.

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Mance’s Inspiration: A Wolf Takes Flight

“I only sing the songs that better men have made.”
MANCE RAYDER — JON I, A STORM OF SWORDS

So I think I made a compelling case for Jenny’s song actually being the prophetic ‘song of ice and fire’.

However that was more of building block than a capstone in my exploration of these ideas. This essay, the spiritual successor to that one, articulates the following:

There are many singers in contemporary Westeros that know Jenny’s song.

A close examination of these singers and their manifestations of the song gives us a fuller picture of the song’s nature, themes and content.

A number of careful observations seemingly allow the inference of a second verse from the song.

This possible verse suggests something profound was planned at Winterfell.

Something involving Mance.

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The Red Sun Rises, The Glass Candle Burns: The Lost Targaryen Prince

Mance Rayder is the son of Duncan “the Small” Targaryen and Jenny of Oldstones.

Depending upon your beliefs regarding the legitimacy of Jon and/or Aegon, this may render Mance to have a more legitimate claim.

Mance may have been fathered (directly or –more likely– otherwise) by Bloodraven.

The ‘evidence’ for these arguments is largely unconventional and will be disagreeable to many readers. I don’t deny this.

This is because a large portion of based on analysis of motifs, prose, patterns. It’s not the kind of hard “in-world” facts that most of us know and love. It draws from an understanding of Martin’s other works and the prominent, pervasive themes throughout his career. It has elements of SWAG (scientific wild-ass guesses) based on existing precedents. It invokes some analysis of the text that may be symbolic (thus scientifically untestable) allusions. The idea culminates with an examination of elements that tie things together like a rug in The Big Lebowski. Continue reading

Stannis and the Covert King

Is Mance Rayder a component of Stannis’s strategy to defeat the Boltons?

Yes.

As I argue here, there is every reason to see that Stannis would fake Mance’s death to benefit his campaign. Further, there are several elements of Stannis’s larger strategy that seem haphazard and juvenile when taken at face value. These concerns are resolved if you come to the conclusion that Stannis and Mance must have been acting in concert. Continue reading