Tag Archives: A Song of Ice and Fire

Influences: With Morning Comes Mistfall

“…Man needs to know.”

“Maybe,” Sanders said. “But is that the only thing man needs? I don’t think so. I think he also needs mystery, and poetry, and romance. I think he needs a few unanswered questions, to make him brood and wonder.”
*   *   *

One of GRRM’s earliest works, With Morning Comes Mistfall was first published in May 1973. It gives us a lot of early insight into the themes and issues that attracted his interest the most.

He seems to be especially concerned with the value of mystery in Mistfall. In particular, he presents a single, thematic conundrum that the reader is left to ponder: Is a mystery sometimes more useful than the truth?

Additionally, the novella introduces a few motifs, symbols and other ideas that can be readily shown to have been transplanted into A Song of Ice and Fire. Continue reading

Who blew the Horn of Joramun?

  • What if there never was an actual, fabled ‘Horn of Winter’, to wake giants from the earth or collapse the Wall?


  • What if there is (was?), and it has already been used?


  • Who would have used it and to what purpose?

I believe there is sufficient evidence in the text to support the argument that the prophesied power of the horn has already been used in the books, right under our noses.

I believe that no such ‘Horn of Winter’ exists, or that if it did or does, it is not relevant.

I believe that the effects of the horn have all been observed, and it is just left to us readers to ascertain what the figurative horn was.

I hope that my arguments and evidence in this essay will entertain and inform you, and leave you ready to draw your own conclusions. Continue reading

I Dream of Ramsay Snow

I would like to regale you with an absurdity. And yet, an absurdity that makes a profound amount of sense.

Jon Snow’s dreams are cryptic visions of events that actually happen to Ramsay Bolton.

Futher, Melisandre’s central prediction about Jon’s death could actually have been about Ramsay.

Can I prove it? Depressingly, no. Can I at least provide an interesting read? I certainly hope so. I hope that some of the things I share herein cause your brain juices to flow. There is certainly something eerie between Jon’s dreams and Ramsay Bolton. Continue reading

A Strategy Emerges: Stannis and the Discourses on Livy

In the previous entries in this series, I’ve disclosed the basis for which Stannis would secretly keep Mance alive, as well as how Stannis benefited from the Karstark betrayal –a betrayal that he likely already knew was coming.

I’ve also pointed out that Stannis is not the type of commander to ‘wing it’ unnecessarily. Yes, medieval battle was rife with risk and uncertainty, but Stannis certainly studies every possible element. No detail is left out of his calculus.

How did Stannis plan to defeat the Boltons and win the north? By remembering his histories. Continue reading

Counterintelligence: Using the Bolton Machine Against Itself

A Riddle from the The Winds of Winter

Sometimes we need to start at the end in order to understand the beginning…

In the Theon’s sample chapter from The Winds of Winter, we are led to believe that Jon’s letter arrived and informed Stannis of Arnolf Karstark’s planned betrayal. The first move we see Stannis take is to confront Karstark’s maester:

“Maester Tybald,” announced the knight of the moths.

The maester sank to his knees. He was red-haired and round-shouldered, with close-set eyes that kept flicking toward Theon hanging on the wall. “Your Grace. How may I be of service?”

Stannis did not reply at once. He studied the man before him, his brow furrowed. “Get up.” The maester rose. “You are maester at the Dreadfort. How is it you are here with us?”
— THEON I, THE WINDS OF WINTER

So I’d like to pose you one riddle before I get on with this essay…

How in seven hells did Stannis know that Tybald was the maester at the Dreadfort?
Continue reading

Stannis: Less Draconian, More Utilitarian.

This is one entry in a forthcoming series describing the campaign for the North.

“I never asked for this, no more than I asked to be king. Yet dare I disregard her?”
He ground his teeth.
“We do not choose our destinies. Yet we must . . . we must do our duty, no?
Great or small, we must do our duty.”
DAVOS V, ASOS

Stannis seems to be driven by a sense of duty, of justice.

Everywhere in the the books we are reminded of Stannis’s unyielding persona, his inflexibility. That he will break before he bends.

But is it true?

Absolutely not.*
* – Certain exceptions apply, see end of essay for details.

Continue reading

Stannis and the Covert King

Is Mance Rayder a component of Stannis’s strategy to defeat the Boltons?

Yes.

As I argue here, there is every reason to see that Stannis would fake Mance’s death to benefit his campaign. Further, there are several elements of Stannis’s larger strategy that seem haphazard and juvenile when taken at face value. These concerns are resolved if you come to the conclusion that Stannis and Mance must have been acting in concert. Continue reading

The Night Lamp: How Stannis will wreck the Freys in TWOW

This page is no longer current. I have revised the “Night Lamp” theory in a new essay that you can read here.


Jon turned to Melisandre. “My lady, fair warning. The old gods are strong in those mountains. The clansmen will not suffer insults to their heart trees.”

That seemed to amuse her. “Have no fear, Jon Snow, I will not trouble your mountain savages and their dark gods.”

Foreword

First and foremost, this post would not be possible without the fantastic original analysis work done by /u/BryndenBFish at his blog, Wars and Politics of Ice and Fire. He wrote a two-part analysis of the battle for Winterfell coming in The Winds of Winter and derived very interesting predictions. I highly recommend reading them before continuing with this post (read part 1 here, part 2 here).


Introduction

BryndenBFish put forth a great theory that Stannis plans to fight the approaching Freys at the crofter’s village. I wholeheartedly agree, and was floored by his analysis.

However, in researching other issues I stumbled across some overlooked information that puts a radical spin on Stannis’s strategy. This information does not drastically alter the larger campaign that BryndenBFish’s essays propose, but rather modifies the fight at the crofter’s village to give an overwhelming tactical advantage to Stannis. Continue reading