Tag Archives: A Song of Ice and Fire

Mance’s Inspiration: A Wolf Takes Flight

“I only sing the songs that better men have made.”
MANCE RAYDER — JON I, A STORM OF SWORDS

So I think I made a compelling case for Jenny’s song actually being the prophetic ‘song of ice and fire’.

However that was more of building block than a capstone in my exploration of these ideas. This essay, the spiritual successor to that one, articulates the following:

There are many singers in contemporary Westeros that know Jenny’s song.

A close examination of these singers and their manifestations of the song gives us a fuller picture of the song’s nature, themes and content.

A number of careful observations seemingly allow the inference of a second verse from the song.

This possible verse suggests something profound was planned at Winterfell.

Something involving Mance.

Continue reading

Composer of Prophecy: Rhaegar’s Song of Love and Doom

“I only sing the songs that better men have made.”
MANCE RAYDER — JON I, A STORM OF SWORDS

Rhaegar had a unique knowledge of the prophecy concerning the promised prince.

He kept this knowledge in a secret place…

…somewhere in plain sight, within reach of anyone…

…and yet safe from harm or destruction.

He put the prophecy in a song.

Jenny’s song. Continue reading

The Red Sun Rises, The Glass Candle Burns: The Lost Targaryen Prince

Mance Rayder is the son of Duncan “the Small” Targaryen and Jenny of Oldstones.

Depending upon your beliefs regarding the legitimacy of Jon and/or Aegon, this may render Mance to have a more legitimate claim.

Mance may have been fathered (directly or –more likely– otherwise) by Bloodraven.

The ‘evidence’ for these arguments is largely unconventional and will be disagreeable to many readers. I don’t deny this.

This is because a large portion of based on analysis of motifs, prose, patterns. It’s not the kind of hard “in-world” facts that most of us know and love. It draws from an understanding of Martin’s other works and the prominent, pervasive themes throughout his career. It has elements of SWAG (scientific wild-ass guesses) based on existing precedents. It invokes some analysis of the text that may be symbolic (thus scientifically untestable) allusions. The idea culminates with an examination of elements that tie things together like a rug in The Big Lebowski. Continue reading

The Low Cunning of Giants: The Devious Geniuses in House Umber

The logistics behind sending messages in Westeros came to sudden prominence in A Dance with Dragons. We suddenly see additional details, such as the different types of ink, message security, and the use of signs and seals.

But there is one such chain of letters and messages, so rife with mysteries and conspicuous errors, they merit an investigation unlike any other in the books.

For those who want me to get to the point…

  • I specifically examine three of the letters in A Dance with Dragons.
  • In examining them I point out what’s incurably wrong with each of them.
  • I propose what I think are the most rational explanations.

Most notably that…

I believe the letters were written by Mors or Hother Umber, as ‘coded’ messages to Stannis, Mance, Val or possibly Melisandre.

Additionally, Mors and Hother Umber are devious geniuses.

Continue reading

Abomination in Training: The Indoctrination of a Greenseer

Have you ever felt like the popular ‘Jojen Paste‘ theories were in some way correct, but incompletely articulated… they’re missing something?

Well I hope to allay those thoughts and put forth a compelling viewpoint, that goes a step further. Specifically, this is what this essay argues:

Bran was purposefully introduced to cannibalism during his trek to the Cave of the Three-Eyed Crow, culminating with the consumption of Jojen’s blood during the ‘weirwood paste’ ceremony.

This central idea is underpinned by the following observations:

The consumption of certain human flesh is a route to greater power as a skinchanger.

The ability to warg more difficult subjects, such as humans, is evidence of such power.

A skinchanger must have demonstrated such significant power in order to be joined to the weirwoods.

Thus Coldhands, Bloodraven and Leaf have been taking actions to make this transformation as smooth and expedient as possible.

This essay explores these ideas and uses them to articulate the larger point. Additionally, I take some time at the end to address specific logistical questions that I anticipate will come up. Continue reading